Just Arthritis – NOT.


Saw more logs

Sleep is so important to those of us with an already weak immune system.

It’s no secret that catching major Z’s can be virtually impossible when you have RA (Rheumatoid Arthritis), especially when your disease is flaring. Whatever the reason for not being able to sleep; pain, stress, anger, all of the above; sleep is so important for your overall health. In fact, insomnia can further damage an already dysfunctional immune system.

In Health Monitor’s March 2012 issue of “My Guide to RA”, they share 5 tips to help us Rheumies saw more logs (a fancy way to say “get more sleep”).

1. Cover the basics. Your bedroom should help you relax. Make sure you have a comfortable mattress, high-quality pillows and no clutter.

2. Develop a relaxation ritual. Plan to relax and wind down at least one hour before you go to sleep. This could include dimming the lights, turning off the TV, listening to soft music, meditating, and/or taking a warm bath with candles and a book.

3. Stretch, stretch, stretch! At home—and even on the road when you travel for work – Some make it a priority to take a hot shower each night. And then follow up with a series of stretches, including yoga.

4. Have sleep and pain medications ready. Check with your doctor to identify the appropriate medicine to take in the evening. After three or four nights of poor sleep, some will turn to a prescribed sleep medication—but only after they have gone through the typical routine of stretching and a hot shower. Tim, a man afflicted by RA said “I used to reach for a sleep aid when I could have stretched,” he notes. “It is so convenient to take the pill.”

5. Exercise regularly. “I try to get good exercise during the course of the day. It just makes my joints feel more lubricated,” says Tim, who likes to walk, bike, swim and work out on the elliptical machine. However, he makes sure to work out earlier in the day, as exercising late will stimulate him and keep him awake.

However it is that you choose to stay in shape through exercise and or relax, just make an effort to do it. Your body will thank you and be more apt to rest at night. God knows you deserve it because fighting disease can definitely take a toll on your system. The full article can be found here.


This is a pretty inspirational video on a young Australian woman diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis. Not only does it prove that arthritis doesn’t discriminate as she was young, fit and active when her symptoms began, but it also shows how a positive outlook and quick action can help make this chronic disease more tolerable.

Video  —  Posted: January 15, 2013 in The faces of Rheumatoid Arthritis
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katiestew:

Thanks for this educational blog from Warm Socks about ERA.

Originally posted on ∞ itis:

Enthesitis Related Arthritis is a form of arthritis that begins in people under 16 years of age.  Although it is more commonly diagnosed in boys, girls can also have ERA.  Onset is usually between the ages of 9-12.

ERA is also sometimes simply called enthesitis.  If a child has been diagnosed with enthesitis by a pediatric rheumatologist and requires long-term follow-up, verify with the doctor that the full name of the disease is ERA aka enthesitis-related juvenile idiopathic arthritis.  Not only is enthesitis one of the forms of JIA, but it is also part of a group of diseases called spondyloarthropathies.

This type of arthritis is significantly different from osteoarthritis, which is the type of arthritis typically seen in older people and athletes. In osteoarthritis (OA), the cartilage cushion at the joint between two bones wears away.   Bone-on-bone is extremely painful.  With OA, tylenol…

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1950s women rubbing feet; heals; pain

Walk a day in my shoes

Too often, I get lost in my everyday routine… work, friends, family; LIFE so much so that I simply forget to write or writing just keeps moving to the bottom of my priority list. This is especially true when my RA is under control. But lately, my RA has been again flaring and so thoughtfully reminding me why I started this blog in the first place; to vent, learn and let others share their stories of pain and courage with the rest of the world.

The other day, I received the most heartfelt, honest email from a girl named Cara who just happened to stumble upon my blog. While it broke my heart to read all the pain that she has endured over the last 5 years, Cara’s email encouraged me to get back on track with my writing and inspire others like her to share their stories.

Below is Cara’s email which she graciously agreed to let me share with all of you.

Hi Katie! My name is Cara, I’m 24, I live in Philly and I have RA and Lupus- my doctor affectionately calls it Rupus. I felt the need to write you, because I was just diagnosed this past spring and I’ve been really struggling this summer.

My mom sent me your blog because of your kitchen gadgets post (I recently decided to cook myself healthy- down 18lbs in like 3 weeks, gluten free!) and as soon as I started to read I burst into tears. I know it sounds crazy to be so emotional but I want you to know that its really awesome that you’re writing this blog- I have felt so alone for the past few months, even though my family, friends and doctors have been awesome, I still really feel like no one knows what I’m going through.

I’ve been really sick since I was about 19, and no one has been able to put their finger on it- I’ve been told all kinds of things, I’ve even been asked if I had seen a psychiatrist (I have, but I’m sick not crazy!) so I thought that this would make everything better- I thought this was the light at the end of the tunnel, but I feel like I’m still chasing that light- do you know what I mean? I’m sure that you do. It was really nice to read about being a “strong woman” and crying when squeezing your fingers- last Sunday it felt like someone was taking a sledge hammer and smashing my wrists and hands. I generally consider myself to have a high pain tolerance- I fell and broke my wrist last summer and didn’t even realize it- but last Sunday I was sitting on my bedroom floor against my bed sobbing because of this “invisible” pain, it was unreal. I felt like a crazy person.

I recently started Humira (in addition to Plaquenil), I have my second injection on Friday. I’m scared- like you said, I feel like a 5 year old. I’m not afraid of needles but it burns SO bad, I hate it. My boyfriend said he would stick me, but I feel like I need to do it- like I need to prove to myself that I can do it- I won’t be beaten. Although admittedly its hard to not feel like I’m being beaten, because some days I feel like I’m dying- not like, “omg, this pain is so bad I’m dying”, like I’m actually dying, like my body has hit the self-destruct button and its slowly shutting down. I was in the hospital a few weeks ago for breathing difficulty. At first it was like ok, its probably just your asthma, and then when they saw my fingers and toes were blue and when they found out I had RA and Lupus the hospital staff looked at me with panic. I’ve never seen panic in the eyes of medical staff before. They genuinely thought I had a pulmonary embolism and went into emergency mode. It was really scary. Thankfully it was just costrocondritis, but they also found a nodule in my lung which is caused by the RA.

I see the pulminologist tomorrow to get it checked out- make sure its nothing more sinister. I’m sorry for the rant and I’m sorry if I sound so negative, I’m really not a negative person! I’ve just so nice to find someone who was diagnosed at the same age as me and who seems to be dealing with it. I guess I just want to know if it gets better (Like those commercials “It gets better”).

You’re 30 now? I just can’t imagine feeling like this for the rest of my life, I really can’t. I used to be a dancer- I danced 5-6 days a week. I’ve had to stop working recently because I just get too tired! Even going to the grocery store wears me out! I’m hoping the Humira starts kicking in and I can go back to work soon- I need that money honey!

Anyway, the whole point of this email was really just to say, thank you. Thank you, thank you. I know I don’t know you, and I’ll probably never meet you, but thank you. Your blog means more to mean that you know, and I’m sure it means a lot to other people too. I’m sorry for this diarrhea email, I started writing and couldn’t stop- but its somewhat cathartic getting it all out there, even to a complete stranger. Thank you again, and know that I’ll keep reading, as long as you keep writing, maybe it will help us both keep going. -Cara

If you have a story you’d like to share with myself and others in the spoonie community, Cara and I both would encourage you to do so. I firmly believe that we all have to stick together because nobody can quite understand what we’re going through without walking (or limping) a day in our shoes.

Thank you Cara for reminding me what is important… You are.


Innovations Consulting Group is holding a FREE series of workshops for patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis this Tuesday, 7/17 at the Cornell Club at 6 East 44th Street from 6-8PM.

RSVP online at:  www.innovationsgroup.org/events

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Calling all Chicago folks affected by Rheumatoid Arthritis!

Innovations Consulting Group is holding a FREE series of workshops for patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis this Thursday, 6/14 at the InterContinental Chicago Hotel located on Michigan Avenue from 6PM-8PM.

Patient workshop invitation