Posts Tagged ‘sleep’


Sleep

Does anyone else with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) have trouble sleeping? The crazy thing is, it’s not the pain that keeps me up at night. At least I don’t think it is the pain, or perhaps I’m partially immune to the pain after 12 years of living with RA. Could it be side effects from my medication? Stress? Work? Life? One thing is for certain. The more I think about sleep, the less I sleep.

I’ve written about RA’s connection to sleep and fatigue before, but it’s been a while so I recently started to re-research the connection . Turns out 50% of RA patients have complained about insomnia. 50%?? That’s insanity! Not that it matters, but nobody warned me about this side effect! Add it to the list…

I’ve tried reading, watching TV, taking melatonin, general relaxing, meditation, the HeadSpace app, warm baths before bed, drinking warm milk like a baby… Heck, I’ve even tried Lunesta which actually works, but I’m afraid of getting addicted or sleepwalking.

So I’m reaching out to my spoonie friends for help. What sleep remedy works best for you? I’m willing to try just about anything.


Saw more logs

Sleep is so important to those of us with an already weak immune system.

It’s no secret that catching major Z’s can be virtually impossible when you have RA (Rheumatoid Arthritis), especially when your disease is flaring. Whatever the reason for not being able to sleep; pain, stress, anger, all of the above; sleep is so important for your overall health. In fact, insomnia can further damage an already dysfunctional immune system.

In Health Monitor’s March 2012 issue of “My Guide to RA”, they share 5 tips to help us Rheumies saw more logs (a fancy way to say “get more sleep”).

1. Cover the basics. Your bedroom should help you relax. Make sure you have a comfortable mattress, high-quality pillows and no clutter.

2. Develop a relaxation ritual. Plan to relax and wind down at least one hour before you go to sleep. This could include dimming the lights, turning off the TV, listening to soft music, meditating, and/or taking a warm bath with candles and a book.

3. Stretch, stretch, stretch! At home—and even on the road when you travel for work – Some make it a priority to take a hot shower each night. And then follow up with a series of stretches, including yoga.

4. Have sleep and pain medications ready. Check with your doctor to identify the appropriate medicine to take in the evening. After three or four nights of poor sleep, some will turn to a prescribed sleep medication—but only after they have gone through the typical routine of stretching and a hot shower. Tim, a man afflicted by RA said “I used to reach for a sleep aid when I could have stretched,” he notes. “It is so convenient to take the pill.”

5. Exercise regularly. “I try to get good exercise during the course of the day. It just makes my joints feel more lubricated,” says Tim, who likes to walk, bike, swim and work out on the elliptical machine. However, he makes sure to work out earlier in the day, as exercising late will stimulate him and keep him awake.

However it is that you choose to stay in shape through exercise and or relax, just make an effort to do it. Your body will thank you and be more apt to rest at night. God knows you deserve it because fighting disease can definitely take a toll on your system. The full article can be found here.